200th posting


And to think, just two weeks ago I was cycling in Florida in shorts and a T-shirt.

When I began Pedal2Page, nearly four years ago, not for a minute did I think my blog about riding a bicycle would go on for this long. But last week's "Alligator alley" posting was number 200. Wow!


It's quite obvious that I'm passionate about this wonderful sport. Sometimes when I'm out cycling, I will look down upon my bike and think "boy, I'm so lucky to still be able to do something I really love." Believe me, being only a few days away from turning 70 years old, that thought certainly carries some real meaning. And I still don't have to utilize an e-bike. Yes, I'm a purist when it comes to two-wheeled machines, but never in a million years would I want to disparage those who need a little assistance in order to feel the breeze brushing against their face.


All along, my goal with Pedal2Page has been to pass along my enthusiasm for going for a pedal, and possibly encourage others to go for a spin. Or maybe rekindle a spark for undertaking anything that brings one pleasure. My postings are meant to entertain, to inform, to hopefully show cyclists having some fun and friendship, and to share my mishaps and deeds. I hope I have succeeded in that.


I enjoy the journal-style writing on a consistent basis. It can be challenging to discover fresh topics; once accomplished, it feels like discovering new places to ride my bike. I trust there hasn't been too much duplication, something I strive mightily to avoid.


Lastly, I would like to thank those who take the time to read Pedal2Page, especially my regular followers. I know, for some, it is a connection that we look forward to every Friday. I guess I'll keep offering my thoughts and ideas ... just like I will undoubtedly keep riding a bicycle.


My latest read


"One Last Great Thing: A Story of a Father and a Son, a Story of a Life and a Legacy"

by John Burke

Free Press, 2012


Purposely, I'm not going to divulge too much about this book by John Burke, who is the president of Trek Bikes. It is a memoir about his father, Dick, who was the founder of Trek. But in order to give you a peek as to its message, I would like to share an email I sent to the author. By the way, the book is a quick read at only 130 pages and worth locating a copy — to find out about the "one last great thing."


"Dear Mr. Burke. I just finished your book 'One Last Great Thing.' It was informative on learning about the beginnings of Trek. But kind of like Lance Armstrong's first book 'It's Not About the Bike,' the best part for me was discovering the relationship between you and your father. Reading about The Big Guy reminded me about many moments with my own dad. Just like your father, my dad was short in stature, but more than made up for it with his passing on to me many of life's lessons that I still value and practice to this day. The big ones being: be respectful, be kind to others, and if you are going to do anything ... do it right. Thank you for sharing your story."


I actually received a reply, on the same day, from John Burke. Here's what he wrote:


"Hi Patrick,

Thank you for the note! I am happy to hear that you were able to make a personal connection to the book and your relationship with your father. Hang onto those life lessons, they are invaluable.

Jb."


Kind of cool. Stay safe!


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